Anti-War movement persists on streets of Newark By Max Pizarro

August 27, 2007

“Saturday was one of biggest marches held in Newark for a long time,” said Hamm. “I thought it sent two strong messages. The first is it said to the Bush administration that we want a change in spending priorities in this country, from the war in Iraq to the needs of people here at home. And we want the war to end. We want the troops to come home.”

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March for Peace, Equality, Jobs and Justice – 08/25/07

March for Peace, Equality, Jobs and Justice – 08/25/07
August 25, 2007

People\'s March for Peace, Equality, Jobs & Justice

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The People’s March for Peace, Equality, Jobs & Justice – August 25, 2007

August 25, 2007

On August 25, 2007, more than 1,000 people marched and rallied, on a blazing hot day in downtown Newark, NJ. Marching in solidarity, and calling for an immediate end to the Iraq war and the redirection of the billions spent on war toward the desperate needs in our communities at home, the diverse crowd commemorated the 44th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s March on Washington, the 2nd anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the 40th anniversary of the Newark Rebellion. Lawrence Hamm and Vicki White of the People’s Organization for Progress kick off the rally at Lincoln Park. Video by Ian Cook.

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Groups rally after death of 3,000 soldiers in terrorism war by Saeed Shabazz (The Final Call)

Groups rally after death of 3,000 soldiers in terrorism war by Saeed Shabazz (The Final Call)
January 18, 2007

‘The people must know that nearly $530 billion has been spent by this president on war, while cuts have been made in domestic programs dealing with education, health and housing.’
Lawrence Hamm Co-Chairman of the NJ Millions More Movement

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Larry Hamm, I am NJ by The Star Ledger

Larry Hamm, I am NJ by The Star Ledger
December 31, 2006

Larry Hamm, I am NJ – The Star Ledger

Powerhouse to the People
Social justice is a cause close to Newark activist’s heart

Story by BRAD PARKS / Photos by MITSU YASUKAWA
Published: Sunday, December 31, 2006, 12:33 PM

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Tens of thousands march against police killings

Tens of thousands march against police killings
December 23, 2006

On Dec. 15, a march sponsored by the People’s Organization for Progress was held in Newark, N.J., to demand justice for Warren Lee. Lee died on Oct. 12 while being beaten and arrested by Newark police. Other rallies were organized by the New Black Panther Party and the October 22nd Coalition.

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Years later, lessons from Newark riots to be learned

Years later, lessons from Newark riots to be learned
November 26, 2006

Lawrence Hamm has a different perspective.

Since the 1980s, Hamm’s group, The People’s Organization for Progress, has been the only group to hold an annual observance.

“The rebellion gave rise to the political movement, gave rise to the first black mayor in Newark, the first majority black City Council,” Hamm says. “The rebellion pushed forward people’s social consciousness.”

Detroit, whose 1967 riots were the worst in modern U.S. history until the 1992 Los Angeles riots left

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CALL FOR A STATEWIDE CONFERENCE ON THE U.S. WAR IN IRAQ: IMPACT & OPPOSITION IN OUR COMMUNITIES

CALL FOR A STATEWIDE CONFERENCE ON THE U.S. WAR IN IRAQ: IMPACT & OPPOSITION IN  OUR COMMUNITIES
July 27, 2006

The Agitator July 2006 (Statement by Lawrence Hamm, Chairman, People’s Organization For Progress) Stop The War The U.S. war in Iraq …Read the Rest

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Activists demand that Earl Faison case be reopened by Shabazz, Saeed (New York Amsterdam News)

Activists demand that Earl Faison case be reopened by Shabazz, Saeed (New York Amsterdam News)
April 27, 2006

NEWARK-The Newark-based People’s Organization for Progress (POP) hand delivered a letter to New Jersey State Attorney General Zelima V. Farber on April 11, regarding re-opening the murder case of Earl Faison. It has been seven years since the aspiring rapper died at age 27 at the hands of five Orange, New Jersey police officers, who had arrested him as a suspect in the murder of a fellow police officer.

The U.S. Attorney said that Faison died in a “stairwell of torture” because he was brutalized out of the sight of those who were present in the Orange police station where they were holding him. Police officials stated in 1999 that Faison died of an asthma attack. While he remained handcuffed, Faison was beaten and pepper sprayed in his mouth and nose.

The POP letter to the attorney general stated that the case should be reopened because Taison lost more than his civil rights, he lost his life and someone must be held accountable for his death.” It also stated in the letter that if “the murder case of Emmett Till can be reopened after 50 years…then the case of Earl Faison can be reopened after seven years.”

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People vs. Police Terror Interview with Parents of Police Murder Victims

People vs. Police Terror Interview with Parents of Police Murder Victims
May 21, 2005

Fight Back! talked on May 8 with Elizabeth (Bonnie) Moore, whose son Rasheed, 26, was killed in January by Newark, NJ police officer Thomas Ruane (see Fight Back! March/April 2005.) Fight Back! also talked with Earl Williams, whose son Earl Faison was killed by Orange, NJ policemen in April of 1999. After a struggle of five years, led by the Faison’s family and by the People’s Organization for Progress, four cops were sentenced to terms of 33 months each for violations of the victim’s civil rights. One officer was sentenced to nine years.

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